Category Archives: Hello My Name Is

Hello My Name Is: Nina

Name: Nina
Crew: Style Lovers Cru
City/Country: Rome, Italy
When did you start writing? 2000

What’s graffiti for you?
Graffiti is my culture and my lifestyle. I thank the graffiti every day for met my boyfriend and bringing me out of my neighborhood made of crime and violence.

Influences?
I take inspiration from everything I see and live.

Tell us about your city, how is life and graffiti there?
I love Rome for me it is a wonderful city. Life in the city is frenzied but full of things to do like events, exhibitions, concerts. The graffiti scene in Rome is made up of many people, crews and different styles, every corner of Rome is painted. From the metro A and B along the line, the walls, shutters and the highway panels. Then we have legal walls to work for big productions for days.

What keeps you still writing?
It is a dependence XD.

What first made you interested in graffiti and how did you end up on that track?
When I was a child with my parents I always admired the graffiti, I saw walking with them in the city. My father brought me books from New York, and I began to document them on this magnificent culture that day after day. My first approach was in 98 with sketch on paper and write my name on the door of my room XD and then i went to jams to look at people painting. Then I met people in my neighborhood who painted and started with them in the summer of 2000, together with the apologies for late!

What trends are you seeing now in the graffiti world that you don’t like?
I see a tendency to copy without too much scruples and personality, all with the desire to make super stars and wanna be.

What do you do when you’re not painting?
When I do not paint I work as a photographer, I take care of curators for graffiti exhibitions, and support and collaboration as much as possible Onlus for abandoned animals.

How would you describe your style?
It’s classic, traceable to the new york style with european revisions.

Can you remember the first piece you did?
Sure, one of my most beautiful memories. It was a summer night in 2000, I worked several days on the bubble sketch (My name has been my tag for several months), I went for the first time to buy sprays at the hardware store. I buy 6 happy colors in pink and erika, black outline. I was with my friends who made the pole, painting on the recess wall of my neighborhood park. I was very excited and I told myself, ok I’m a graffiti writer today! My parents when I returned at 5am I got punished for a week! XD

Future plans?
I am preparing my own line for an interior design company, an exhibition project, and a project for a book. In September I hope to make a nice trip.

Do you adapt your pieces and tags to the spot/surface?
I like painting on spots and different surfaces, testing my creativity and give me ideas and input.

What do you think about the new generation of writers in your city?
I think new generations live and under go the problems of our society more violently than we have experienced. Graffiti Ilore is the venture of their emotional state of anger. Many of them do not know the history and culture of the graffiti percuta do not follow the code and the rules that are part of it. This leads them to live in an Anarchist jungle in The Warriors style. For me it is important and a responsibility to be present and available for the new generation, let’s go out, paint with them and bring them my cultural experience and baggage.

What are the best and worst aspects of graffiti?
The best of the graffiti are the friendships that have emerged in these years.
Worse is the sexism.

Who do you paint for?
I paint for me and to carry on the culture of graffiti.

What writers have inspired you?
Dondi, Zephyr, Bates, Cantwo, Miedo and Stand.

Can you ever feel tired of graffiti?
After 3 days of painting on a wall, I’m a bit tired. Age begins to make itself felt!! XD

What do you hope people will think and feel when they see your stuff?
I hope people realize that my graffiti is not vandalism but a form of expression made of so much work, sweat, commitment, and research. And money!

FIVE FAVORITES
Spray Paint: Mtn94 / Loop
City: Rome
Markers/pens: Water based, Molotow / Touch, Staedtler
Surface: Smooth and brick
Cap: NY soft cap and Skinny banana cap

Instagram: @_ladynina_

Hello My Name Is: Twesh

Name: Twesh
Crew: 3A, Heavy Artillery (HA), Upsetters
City/Country: London, England
When did you start writing? 1996

What’s graffiti for you?
Ah difficult one already, I think graffiti writing technically is more discipline, a language.

Influences?
Over the years I had many influences, some coming from outside the graffiti world, but mainly from classic New York golden era in the 80s.

What keeps you still writing?
After quite a long time as a writer i started asking myself this question quite a few times, still no answer.

What first made you interested in graffiti and how did you end up on that track?
I always liked graffiti in my city and I always thought I would never be able to do something like that! The quality for the styles was incredible and for being a small city I rate it as one of the top places in Italy at the time for style writers (mid 90’s). At the time I was 15 yrs old i was dj-ing funk, soul and breakbeats in house parties in my city and that got me in touch with breakers and writers and the hip hop community. Having met them made me decide to give graffiti a proper go (as i was just tagging and doing the toy stuff) and now I am still here, not dj-ing anymore unfortunately.

What trends are you seeing now in the graffiti world that you don’t like?
I’m ok with any trend really. Before the internet there was still people that where trendsetters like SDK, WUFC or TWS or INC Crew from Amsterdam. I miss the fact that the identity and style of a city is now disappearing. What I mean is before the internet people used to influence each other in real life (therefore there would be trends that explode just in one city because that was the only comparison they had), as there wasn’t that many mags either. So you had the London style (with the chunky funky letters), or the LA style (with the calligraphic and cholo influenced style) or the Berlin style (with the craziest stretching of letters). I miss this, now people can more easily access to graffiti worldwide and the Style of a city is unfortunately disappearing. Now if you want to know about a famous writer you just search it on the internet, and that research will place an impact on you, before you had to go to the hall of fame or the train station and the styles you see will place an impact on your future pieces.

What do you do when you’re not painting?
Get on with the normal human life.

How would you describe your style?
Tweshyfied New York Style.

Do you adapt your pieces and tags to the spot/surface?
This is really something I envy from people such Zoer from France and Delta for example. I guess the fact that I mostly have a classical new york structure of the letter makes it more difficult to interact with strange wall shapes. I really have to work more on this side of things as it really amaze me how certain people tackle walls in a very different way based on the shape of it.

What do you think about the new generation of writers in your city?
There is stuff i really like and stuff i like less, like for all things in life. I guess with London sometimes the line between street art and writing gets blurred making strange to identify writers from graphic designer to sign painters or street artist. I like the work of Oust, Inuk and Salem in London because in a way they are maintaining the Classic London letter structure but with a very fresh twist.

What are the best and worst aspects of graffiti?
Unfortunately there are quite few things that i do not like about graffiti, one of those is When the ego mix up with illegal actions this can fuck up with your brain, and you can easily become a narrow minded person. One great thing is that over the years i traveled Europe and world painting and having crazy cool experiences with cool people i met just for a few hours to hit a yard or painting trackside. Graffiti made also my life in London much easier when i moved here as it was quick to meet people/writers which then became my very good friends also.

Who do you paint for?
In the name of GOD! lol

What writers have inspired you?
Too many to mention, but my crews(3AHAUPS) are the top people that inspire and push me the most, and then TWS with DreamDare and Toast back in the 90s; meeting them and painting Basel trackside with them was a massively inspiring experience for me that made me realise how important graffiti was in my life.

Can you ever feel tired of graffiti?
Hope this will ever happen.

What do you hope people will think and feel when they see your stuff?
I do not want to upset people with my graffiti so i think that everyone likes it. I really see graffiti writing as a language that needs to be decoded and studied for being appreciated, so in general opinions from other writers is what i am more keen to hear; general public will always see my pieces as an abstract painting.

FIVE FAVOURITES
Spray Paint: Anything
City: Basel (Switzerland)
Markers/pens: Anything
Surface: Metal
Cap: NY fat cap

Instagram: @tweshone

Hello My Name Is: Urocki

Name: Urocki
Crew: HSB
City/Country: Nantes, France, soon moving to London.
When did you start writing? 2005

What’s graffiti for you?
A passion.

Influences?
So much…

Tell us about your city, how is life and graffiti there?
Both are really nice, a lot of creative people in many field, and the city have a true cultural will. I’m moving soon to London, but as always I’ll return to Nantes.

What keeps you still writing?
Passion, competition, inspiration, a desire to evolve and improve.

What first made you interested in graffiti and how did you end up on that track?
Drawing at school, magazines, then people I met. The first graffiti writers I met were Dropse, Dizzy, Isma.

What trends are you seeing now in the graffiti world that you don’t like?
There’s nothing I really hate, everything is interesting. Maybe the division between old timers and new generation, between vandal and legal graffiti is something sad from my point of view.

What do you do when you’re not painting?
Drawing, playing chess, watching movies, eating, hanging out with friends, travelling, 420…

How would you describe your style?
Simple, effective, typography inspired.

Can you remember the first piece you did?
Oh yes… I wish I don’t !

Future plans?
Moving to London this summer, develop more classic letters skills, gold leaf on glass and traditional handmade letters.

Do you adapt your pieces and tags to the spot/surface?
Not really, most of the time my sketch is already done.

What do you think about the new generation of writers in your city?
I’m always happy to see people painting, but honestly I don’t really see them. May the force be with them.

What are the best and worst aspects of graffiti?
The best: community, friends, competition, inspiration, travel, connections. 
The worst: attitude, bad mentality sometimes, internet haters, narrow view.

Who do you paint for?
Me, my friends, and all people who will see my paint.

What writers have inspired you?
MSK, UB, WB, C29 … the list is too long!

Can you ever feel tired of graffiti?
Some times, but it never lasts long.

What do you hope people will think and feel when they see your stuff?
“Daaaaaaaamn!”

FIVE FAVORITES
Spray Paint: 94
City: Nantes
Markers/pens: Rotring
Surface: All of them
Cap: Original

Website: behance.net/urocki
Instagram: @Urocki
Tumblr: urocki.tumblr.com

Hello My Name Is: Raws

Name: Raws
Crew: Super Bad Boys, Officials
City/Country: Berlin, Germany
When did you start writing? 2004

What’s graffiti for you?
Graffiti means a lot to me! Because of graffiti I could manage to travel a lot all over Europe and maybe one time around the world.;) To make it short: graffiti for me is creativity, friends, traveling, collecting, fun, work and struggle.

Influences?
I get my influences from everything around me. Graphics, films, advertisement or arts are just some of my influences. I love abstract works by artists like Picasso, Kandinsky, Richter or Lichtenstein. When it comes to graffiti/urban art, nowadays I love works by Pantone, Dems, Pose (MSK), Does or Kaws, because they managed to do the next step apart from classic graffiti styles. Stylewriters like Chas, Soten or Dejoe are also Writers I am impressed of. And for sure all my friends around me.

Tell us about your city, how is life and graffiti there?
Berlin is one of the most important cities, when it comes to graffiti. We have so much illegal and legal graffiti, that influences my works. Crews like 1UP or BerlinKids are just some of the worldwide famous. What is interesting for me, is the fact, that we have so many different styles in the city. The life in Berlin is very hectic, stressful but also nice and relaxed. Especially the summer in Berlin is amazing!

What keeps you still writing?
Haters. 😀

What first made you interested in graffiti and how did you end up on that track?
I think the fact, that it is illegal but creative. Nowadays it is the searching for the perfect piece.

What trends are you seeing now in the graffiti world that you don’t like?
I don’t like that there is more and more a separation between the illegal and legal graffiti (especially in Berlin), because some people think legal graffiti is not “real”. For me everything belongs together and I have big respect for the hardcore writers.

What do you do when you’re not painting?
Sports, working as graphic designer and video producer.

How would you describe your style?
Graphical, clean, abstract, versatile.

Can you remember the first piece you did?
Oh thats hard. I think there was one with a friends. After tagging the whole night, we painted a piece on the backsite of a transformer plant, which wasn’t seen by anyone, because it stood in the middle of a forest. 😀

Future plans?
Find my own way of painting abstract paintings on canvas. And for sure a lot of traveling!

What do you think about the new generation of writers in your city?
I don’t know if there are many new writers. When I started in my circle of friends graffiti was really hyped and everyone was tagging. I think graffiti is more like a special thing these days. But I am not into the young guns business. Sorry.

What are the best and worst aspects of graffiti?
Best: Doing the details at the end of spraying a piece and to come back at home and see what you done that day. And sure, the time with friends.
Worst: Haters, bad talking in the game about what writer X did last weekend and why writer Y is painting with writer Z…. blablabla..

Who do you paint for?
Myself and the girls. ;D

What do you hope people will think and feel when they see your stuff?
Tom says: “Oh thats a good style, the colors are amazing and look at the cleaness!” and Niko added: “I like the idea of that abstract look and how he arranged the forms and letters.”. Both are very happy. Tom sends money to Raws because of that awesome piece.

FIVE FAVORITES
Spray Paint: Montana Cans/ Montana Colors
City: Berlin
Markers/pens: All4One
Surface: Raw wall, abandoned places
Cap: One fatcap and one skinny cap.

Website: Rawsone.com
Instagram: @Rawsofficial
Facebook: Raws

Hello My Name Is: Ewze

Name: Ewze
Crew: –
City/Country: Midwest/USA
When did you start writing? I did my first piece in 2005.

What’s graffiti for you?
Personal exploration is the entire reason I do graffiti. The challenge of self improvement in how you handle a piece as well as your interactions with writers and situations that arise within it. I haven’t mastered any aspect of graffiti that I mentioned by any stretch.

Influences?
I grew up in a town with no graffiti scene whatsoever. The internet was the only access to graffiti that I had, aside from seeing stuff on freight trains. I liked timeless looking graffiti right away but it took me awhile to understand it. Classic burners always appealed to and influenced me most.

Tell us about your city, how is life and graffiti there?
I just relocated last year. Some of the best writers in the country live here, and crews who have heavily influenced my style have been/are based out of this place. Living here is great, and has pushed me to be a better person and writer. Good food and scenery to boot.

What keeps you still writing?
It makes me happy.

What first made you interested in graffiti and how did you end up on that track?
I used to draw numbers in middle school. I’d put flames or clouds around them and naturally it progressed into drawing letters and names. When I was 15 I went to Kansas City and saw graffiti in person for the first time. I went home and started painting almost immediately.

What trends are you seeing now in the graffiti world that you don’t like?
There is a lot of positivity within my group of friends now. They do a good job of trying to be nice people and writers. That doesn’t exist everywhere. Some writers aren’t as much that way, and can be difficult to be around or to associate yourself with. I’m not always a naturally positive person but I make a serious effort to be.

What do you do when you’re not painting?
I’m a father and husband. Being both of those things is way more trying and rewarding than being a writer. I do my best.

How would you describe your style?
Graffiti style graffiti. I try to make unique letter structures and keep it simple in the right ways if I can. Still figuring out what works and doesn’t. Never the same outline twice.

Can you remember the first piece you did?
It said “atom” and was done on the back of a soda plant. I did two pieces next to each other the first time.

Future plans?
Learn as much as I can. Travel and make letters and characters that are better than I can make now.

Do you adapt your pieces and tags to the spot/surface?
My favorite thing to paint is freight trains. Many times this will force you to make letters/background that adapt to where the ridges and numbers fall. I’m very much so a process person so some forced change or direction helps me.

What do you think about the new generation of writers in your city?
I am barely older than the newer generation, myself. I think that there’s a good chance some of them write for reasons that are different than myself, but diversity is good for everything. Ignorance and poor decision making is not.

What are the best and worst aspects of graffiti?
The best aspect for myself is enjoying the physical act of graffiti. The smells, a cool breeze, and the mission with friends. The worst aspects of graffiti are easy to forget when you’re painting.

Who do you paint for?
My mental health.

What writers have inspired you?
Dondi, Jepsy, Kase2, Pre, Wane, TCI, HM and many others.

Can you ever feel tired of graffiti?
I got arrested when I was a teenager and was spooked for a couple years. I wasn’t tired of it, but I was overly cautious and didn’t paint much.

What do you hope people will think and feel when they see your stuff?
That I’m improving.

FIVE FAVORITES
Spray Paint: Yardmaster
City: Chicago
Markers/pens: chisel tip sharpie
Surface: raw cinder block
Cap: yellow universals

Instagram: @ewzedoesit